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Fleur Delacour

Fleur DelacourFleur Delacour (born c 1977) is a fictional character from the Harry Potter series of books. She first appeared in the fourth book, Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire and later appeared in the sixth book, Harry Potter and the Half-Blood Prince and is confirmed to appear in the unnamed seventh book.

In the fourth film Delacour was played by Clémence Poésy.


Quick Facts

Gender: Female
Hair colour: Silvery-blonde
Eye colour: Deep blue
School: Beauxbatons
Parentage: Quarter-Veela
Allegiance: Order of the Phoenix (presumed); Bill Weasley
Film portrayer: Clémence Poésy
First appearance: Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire


More...

An alumna of Beauxbatons Academy in France, Fleur is a talented witch, powerful enough to be selected as a champion in the prestigious Triwizard Tournament. After studying with Bill, she now speaks fluent English, albeit with a strong French accent, whereas before she often had trouble expressing herself in her new language.

Her stunningly beautiful looks are in stark contrast (or perhaps in direct relation) to her often arrogant and snooty attitude. Her mannerisms so infuriate some of her fiance's family that an in-joke among their younger members is to refer to Fleur as 'Phlegm'; still, she is rarely rude or aggressive toward those with whom she is in direct contact.

Fleur has a younger sister Gabrielle, (born c 1987). Their grandmother was a veela, making them both at least one quarter veela. This heritage accounts for Fleur's fair hair, skin and eyes, and apparently her ability to entrance men. This could put her in danger from Voldemort and his followers, as they have a strong prejudice against "half-breeds." She is engaged to Bill Weasley, the eldest brother of Ron Weasley.

Fleur's wand is nine and a half inches, inflexible, made of rosewood and contains one of her Veela grandmother's hairs.

According to JK Rowling, her name comes from the French phrase fleur de la cour, meaning "flower of the court" or "noblewoman".

The above information is courtesy of Wikipedia.org